Volume 2, Issue 1 - April 2007

Information technology and ethnic communities

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Editorial: Harnessing ICTs for ethnic community development

Andy Williamson and Ruth DeSouza

This issue of AENJ is about potential. It’s about the way the internet and mobile telecommunications are changing the way our society thinks, links and functions. Access to the information and communication channels available through these networks puts us in a new space, where New Zealand’s tyranny of distance is both diminished and amplified. The internet makes globalisation a reality but it magnifies the local and it has enormous potential to connect and support communities, particularly those who are otherwise disadvantaged. Open as HTML... Open as PDF...

Waka rorohiko

Robert Sullivan

A poem first published in Star Waka, Auckland University Press, 1999. Open as HTML... Open as PDF...

Growing, sustaining and retaining skills in the ICT sector in New Zealand

Hon David Cunliffe MP

Death and taxes are the two unavoidable things in life, or so the saying goes. If it were up to me, I’d add Information and communication technologies (ICT) to the list too. After all, the Internet was designed to survive a nuclear war. There is a difference though–whereas many people would arguably like to avoid death and taxes; digital communications have so many benefits that a lot of people–myself included–would find it hard to picture life without them. Open as HTML... Open as PDF...

Reflections on Enabling the Millennium Development Goals in Puerto Rico: Representations and Realities

Sarai Lastra

Las metas de desarrollo del milenio (MDGs por sus siglas en inglés) fueron adoptadas en 2000 en la asamblea del milenio por 189 gobiernos de los Naciones Unidas (la O.N.U). Las metas internacionales se centran en la reducción de pobreza y la realización del proyecto de salud universal. Un componente crítico del proyecto del milenio es evaluar el progreso de los indicadores en los varios países. La reseña afirma que las clasificaciones tradicionales de nación-estado ponen apremios en la consecución de las metas en paises como Puerto Rico que carecen de representación formal en la O.N.U. Open as HTML... Open as PDF...

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) were adopted in 2000 at the Millennium Assembly by 189 governments from the United Nations (UN). The international goals focus on reducing poverty, achieving health and bringing social justice to an ignored segment of the worldwide community. A critical component of the Millennium Project is evaluating the progress of the goals in the various countries. This article contends that traditional nation-state classifications place constraints on enabling the goals in countries like Puerto Rico that lack formal representation at the UN. Open as HTML... Open as PDF...

Tangata Whenua, the Treaty and the New Zealand Digital Strategy

Robyn Kamira

With the release of New Zealand’s Digital Strategy in 2005 and its Draft Content Strategy in 2006, came the opportunity to identify their potential impact on the Indigenous Peoples of Aotearoa, Tangata Whenua. Open as HTML... Open as PDF...

Asymmetrical Warfare: Having a biffo with the mainstream media

Keith Ng

When I first started university, all the way back in 2000, the world was a very different place. Wikipedia hadn’t been invented, ICQ was still cool, Google was a strangely bland and featureless search engine that only geeks used. Reeling from the dot.com bust and the accumulated mass of well-intentioned homepages with flashing text about nothing in particular, the internet was the subject of scorn as well as hope. Open as HTML... Open as PDF...

Community as an icon

Gilson Schwartz

Brazil is often praised as the ‘country of the future’ and this prospective success makes it even harder to bear the accumulating social and cultural genocides that pervade Brazilian history. On the other hand, Brazil is also mythically praised for her flexible adaptation to all circumstances, a feature very often resembling malice and perversity. Open as HTML... Open as PDF...

Images: ICT working at the grassroots

Whangarei’s one double-five Community House. Open as HTML... Open as PDF...

Increasing the uptake of ICT amongst Pacific Island Early Childhood Education Centres in Manukau City

Kate Sutton

Pacific Island early childhood education providers in Manukau City have low rates of use of information and communication technology. There are also significant barriers towards greater uptake. This is a pity not just for attending children, but because ECE centres can serve as a focus for community use of ICT. What can we do to improve the situation? Open as HTML... Open as PDF...

The promise of information technology?

Richard Pamatatau

The promise of information technology is a more connected, equal and better world but the reality for many is far from that. Anything to do with the Internet, computers and technology seems to carry an exuberant freight–much of it to around making the planet a better place to live. Open as HTML... Open as PDF...

Living Cultural Storybases: Self-empowering narratives for minority cultures

Laura Packer, Paul Rankin and Robin Hansteen-Izora

Half the planet’s languages and cultures are held by 5% of its population–370 million indigenous peoples–the most marginalized, fractured and least represented. For every group dispossessed, urbanized or assimilated, a culture vanishes taking with it unique worldviews and ancient knowledge of the environment, irreplaceable skills, artistry and stories–the rich diversity of humanity. The digital revolution, rather than creating a “global village”, accelerates this worldwide cultural demise. Open as HTML... Open as PDF...

Some tentative thoughts on diaspora and the emergence of voice and video over the internet

Andrew Clark

Based on a series of observations and conversations with friends and family over the four months about their use of voice and video over the Internet (VVOI). This is not an ethnographic study nor is it an academic piece. Its modest aim is to start the reader thinking about how different people quietly go about ‘appropriating’ technology to meet very specific needs, using the diaspora as an example. This reality, I believe, is not yet recognised by most people, as it has been normalised very quickly and integrated into people lives. Open as HTML... Open as PDF...

 

AEN Home
Aotearoa Ethnic Network Journal
ISSN 1177-3472

Volume 2
Issue 1
April 2007

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